Julian Assange of Wikileaks speaks at TED

The controversial website WikiLeaks collects and posts highly classified documents and video. Founder Julian Assange, who’s reportedly being sought for questioning by US authorities, talks to TED’s Chris Anderson about how the site operates, what it has accomplished — and what drives him. The interview includes graphic footage of a recent US airstrike in Baghdad.

You could say Australian-born Julian Assange has swapped his long-time interest in network security flaws for the far-more-suspect flaws of even bigger targets: governments and corporations. Since his early 20s, he has been using network technology to prod and probe the vulnerable edges of administrative systems, but though he was a computing hobbyist first (in 1991 he was the target of hacking charges after he accessed the computers of an Australian telecom), he’s now taken off his “white hat” and launched a career as one of the world’s most visible human-rights activists.

He calls himself “editor in chief.” He travels the globe as its spokesperson. Yet Assange’s part in WikiLeaks is clearly dicier than that: he’s become the face of creature that, simply, many powerful organizations would rather see the world rid of. His Wikipedia entry says he is “constantly on the move,” and some speculate that his role in publishing decrypted US military video has put him in personal danger. A controversial figure, pundits debate whether his work is reckless and does more harm than good. Amnesty International recognized him with an International Media Award in 2009.

Assange studied physics and mathematics at the University of Melbourne. He wrote Strobe, the first free and open-source port scanner, and contributed to the book Underground: Tales of Hacking, Madness and Obsession on the Electronic Frontier.

“WikiLeaks has had more scoops in three years than the Washington Post has had in 30.”

Nmap on Cygwin

Installed nmap on cygwin. Dead easy!

  1. Download and install Cygwin
  2. Download and install WinPCAP
  3. Accept most defaults
  4. Do the default installation, typically C:\cygwin\
  5. Download nmap for windows (zip)
  6. Open the zip file
  7. Double click the folder inside the zip, a large list of files should appear
  8. Extract these files (and not the folder which contains them) to C:\cygwin\usr\local\bin
  9. Open cygwin
  10. Type
    • nmap --version
  11. Your nmap installation on cygwin is now complete

Update 3/May/2012: Try running the vcredist_x86.exe file found in the zip archive if nmap doesn’t seem to run.

For a general understanding of nmap, just type nmap. For a more detailed comprehension, read the manual, and search the web.

Secret or Hidden page in Linksys WAG54g2 ADSL Modem and Wireless Router

Trying to Google this problem was very frustrating. Hopefully it will help someone else. The Linksys WAG54G2 ADSL modem + Wireless Router does not have a GUI page to show more technical information, such as line attenuation, among others.

Therefore, there are some secret or hidden pages built into the device that will reveal this information. The router’s default IP address is 192.168.1.1, but if you have changed yours, the links won’t work, and you should know what to do.

This is why we love you, Gmail: Priority Inbox

Gmail has always been pretty good at filtering junk mail into the “spam” folder. But today, in addition to spam, people get a lot of mail that isn’t outright junk but isn’t very important–bologna, or “bacn.” So we’ve evolved Gmail’s filter to address this problem and extended it to not only classify outright spam, but also to help users separate this “bologna” from the important stuff. In a way, Priority Inbox is like your personal assistant, helping you focus on the messages that matter without requiring you to set up complex rules.”

The Priority Inbox segregates Gmail into three different categories: “Important and Unread”, “Starred”, and “Everything Else”. Gmail automatically filters incoming e-mail into either “Important and Unread” or “Everything Else”, while the middle category is populated by those messages that have been flagged for future reference.

Credit

The Possible Prosecution of WikiLeaks

Such journalistic stories are valuable and necessary, because much hush-hush information is overclassified, is kept under wraps only because it is embarrassing to the U.S. government, or is classified to keep the public in the dark about questionable government policies or actions. During the Cold War and continuing to this day, the American public is often the last to know information that is common knowledge among intelligence agencies of adversarial nations. Excessive government secrecy is a serious and underrated problem in a republic and has been exacerbated by the spike in clandestine government actions in the Bush-Obama war on terror.

If the government of a republic is going to keep secrets from its own people for their own good (faith is required here), they should keep the restricted information to the minimum. If the government drastically reduced its vast storehouse of secrets to what was truly needed to protect intelligence agents and troops in the field, whistleblowers such as Manning would have much less reason to leak and would likely have more respect for the necessity not to disclose the remaining vital information.

Most important, if a republican government cannot keep its secrets secret, it should not prosecute third-party, non-governmental recipients of the material, but should concentrate on plugging the leaks in its security system.

Source: http://original.antiwar.com/eland/2010/08/24/the-possible-prosecution-of-wikileaks/

OpenMediaVault

OpenMediaVault is looking quite promising. Development is still underway, and author has provided no taste to his loyal fans. This is another project from the same developers that brought you FreeNAS, an OS designed to store all of your files safely and secure, and make them accessible via a wide array of different networking protocols. It was based on FreeBSD. However, OpenMediaVault will be based on Debian GNU/Linux.

Review of openSUSE 11.3 – Totally impressive

openSUSE was released on July 15th. I downloaded the 32-bit DVD today, because I wanted to try the new LXDE Desktop that is included with the disk (thanks to Andreas for making that effort!). It is currently being test driven on VirtualBox on openSUSE 11.2, and MAN is it ever FAST! It’s probably the 1.5GB RAM upgrade Continue reading